Ducati

Image of the GP – Aragon: Barbera on fire (literally)

Ok, so image of the GP hasn’t had an airing for a while, a mixture of illness and engagements have left me short of time (you can all still picture that Rossi win in Misano well yourselves, right? Great stuff!).

So to make up for that here’s an image of the GP for Aragon, a bit early, but that I’m pretty sure the riders at MotorLand will struggle to match it – not every day you see this:

 

That brand new Ducati sure gave Hector Barbera more than he was expecting! On a serious note those of you who thought he appeared to be fanning away invisible flames should look away now – the Spainiard may have walked away relatively unharmed but picked up some battle scars – warning – burns in his next tweeted image:

It ended up not being the only drama of the day with Kenny Noyes Moto2 bike also giving off flames, while Taka Nakagami came dangerously close, spurting fuel on the track.

It’s great that riders stand more chance of avoiding injury from these type of accident now, the pictures act as a very real reminder of a not too often seen but very dangerous part of racing.

 

 

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MotoGP: news round-up – Factory 2 explained, ITV4 highlights and Marinelarena improves

As we close in on the start of the season a lot can still change in a week in MotoGP…

Lets start with the UK based news (viewers from the rest of the world skip down the page – your news is below!)

Another excellent WordPress blog – The F1 Broadcasting blog – brings the news that it appears that ITV4 have picked up the MotoGP highlights rights for the forthcoming season, read more here.

This is big news for UK viewers when confirmed by ITV4. Until now after BBC/Eurosport lost the right to show MotoGP all other broadcasters were priced out of the market by the hoover that is BT Sport, moving MotoGP away from free-to-air tv. The young channel now have everything from Premier League football matches to rugby, through womens tennis and even managed to get their sticky fingers on some FA cup games.

BT Sports coverage looks strong, but is more pricey than the incredible detail of the MotoGP pass which costs significantly less. Unless your bargaining is top notch and you don’t move to BT to get free coverage on your initial contract (watch that line rental rocket, early switchers!!) it’s £12-15 a month with Virgin Media/Sky.

What ITV sport have here is a big deal. It should catch all the casual viewers who just want to see who won and who may have been planning to watch it later, delayed due to life commitments and work. They have also removed BT Sports bragging rights as an ‘exclusive’ on tv. Still exclusive for live full coverage yes, but now not just solely on their channel.

BT Sport still don’t even like to mentiontheir channel is available on Virgin Media along with Sky, allowing you to take all your football from one provider, so it will be interesting how long it takes them to adjust their advertising to allow for this amendment.

The big, big, big news of the week though came via Spanish publication AS.com, who published an interview with Dorna CEO Ezpeleta stating his plans to launch ‘Factory2’, nothing more than a flashy manner to shunt Ducati out of the new Open Class after some clever reading of the rules saw them make the move to take advantage of continued testing and development and an increased fuel allowance.

Dorna Managing Director of Events Javier Alonso claims the move is to compliment the existing classes within the championship, without letting the only Open entry capable of running the new second software (Ducati) get an advantage.

He explains:

“As a championship we aim to allow everyone to have the best possible technology, including this type of software, but from talking to the private teams they are not yet set up to be able to use this ‘full software’. Clearly Ducati were not at the same level as Honda and Yamaha last season and what they have done is to look for a way within the rules to improve their grid and race results. We understand that by making some changes they can be closer to the other constructors but we do not want them to have too much of an advantage, as it would be unfair for them to beat the rest of the manufacturers with greater ammunition. So we think the proposal on the table is a good solution.”

The Factory 2 changes mean the now three tier championship runs as follows:

  • Factory bikes (Yamaha/Honda)  Run five sealed engines over a season and have a 20 litre fuel capacity and no access to the extra soft option tyre.
  • Open Class entries have 12 non-sealed engines at thoer disposal and a higher 24 litres of fuel as their limit, they can also use the extra soft option tyre.
  • The proposed Factory 2 class means that any Open entry obtaining three third places, two seconds or a win in dry races will trigger the Factory 2 settings for their bike – a reduction to 9 engines and 22.5 litres of fuel.

The notion that Ducati may exploit the rules too well have foundation. It causes concern though that as Dorna expect all entries to be Open in the near future (much to Honda’s disgust) that as soon as Honda voiced their concerns that Ducati may get a little of their mojo back by exploiting the rules to their advantage a new set of rules are announced.

It also seems to run against logic that you should penalize someone for doing well with the restrictions you have given them, you want to push and promote Open Class racing but, hey don’t do too well in case the Factory teams get upset?

Just when we thought there would be some really competitive racing on the cards.

As a final thought, though essentially brought in as an answer to Ducati’s move it has the potential to suck in Aleix Espargaro, the most successful Open bike in testing to date.

Espargaro who excelled in CRT and who has already set the Open Class bar pretty high has consistantly run in the top five for Forward Yamaha regardless of who was participating and has a chance at the podium in the right conditions. It seems he is on course to get penalized for getting the measure of his bike and being successful way ahead of Ducati.

Does it have it’s own separate class winner? Who knows what lies ahead now!

Let’s finish up with some positive news on Alex Marinelarena. The Tech3 Moto2 rider has seen his condition improve and can now move and speak after a accident at a private test left him in a coma, the second time this has happened to the 21-year old Spaniard after also falling into a coma after crashing in the 2013 season. Team Boss Herve Poncheral has been present and supportive since his fall.

Tech3 web statement:

“Alex Marinelarena, who was injured during a private test at the Paul Ricard Circuit in the south of France last Thursday, awoke this morning from the medically induced cma he was put under. After nearly one week in a deep sleep,  the 21 year old rider was today, able to move his arms and legs as well as speak.

Further examinations will now follow to clarify his condition, but the recovery process has already started.

The Marinelarena family and the whole Tech3 Racing Team wish to thank everyone sincerely for the numerous thoughts and wishes sent during these tough days”.

MotoGP: An Open Class Ducati, fast Rossi and Entry lists finalised

First up Ducati have finally put to bed the Factory vs Open debate after the Jerez test…and picked Open Class.

I was early on this rumour and covered the ins and outs of the decision in my original story for crash.net, available here:

http://www.crash.net/motogp/news/199360/1/ducati-switching-to-open-class-for-motogp-2014.html

I think after Ducati’s news a sit down with a nice strong cup of tea is in order!
Ducati cups image by e-supreme available via Flickr and used under the creative commons agreement.

For everyone who’s still here, here’s the breakdown:

In an interview posted by Italian based website GPOne.com (link to site available in Crash.net article) Ducati rider Andrea Dovizioso is quoted as saying that when testing resumes in February in Sepang that the ‘Factory’ team riders will be testing both the prototype GP14 they were expecting to be riding next season… and the ‘Open’ class Ducati that will be used by Pramac rider Yonny Hernandez.

Ducati seem keen to reveal that they have found little difference in the performance of the two bikes in the testing done so far. The plan therefore seems to be to run an as close to ‘Factory’ effort as possible while exploiting the benefits which come from being an ‘Open’ class entry – more fuel allowance, less engine restriction and as it stands, softer tyre options.

The major negative is the requirement to run the spec ECU package.

On the face of it, if all goes to plan this could be a shrewd move by Ducati.

The Desmosedici has not won a race since 2010 and struggled to a best of fourth last season. It was previously a championship winner under the control of Casey Stoner.

It is clear that after drafting in some of the worlds best mechanics, riders and developers with, for whatever reason, no improvement, that something must be done.

There is a level of expertise to the idea too – Ducati’s new General Manager, Gigi Dall’Igna, was in control at Aprilla last year instead, spearheading the performance of the only CRT bike entries to challenge the Factory and Satellite teams, with CRT champion Aleix Espargaro aboard the most successful of the bikes and often finding his skills mixed with the performance more than a match for the Satellite Ducati’s and even tangling with their Factory entries for final position.

The Open class has been brought in to replace the CRT category.

Though it looks to be a smart move, and certain to put Honda’s backs up (they had threatened to pull out of the championship over future electrical changes and restrictions so another GOOD thing to come from this if it goes ahead) it was until yesterday, until it was said, unthinkable. A step backwards for some of the red machines fans. A step away from a coveted ‘Factory’ bike for the riders.

If you are a casual bike follower perhaps it is easiest to consider it in terms of another sport, lets try F1 for an example:

The equivalent would be telling Vettel he was going to ride out 2014 in a new, improved Torro Rosso instead of the Red Bull but it will still be competitive as he has more fuel to play with and can hopefully use some really soft tyres, as long as the rules aren’t changed before the start of the season. And he doesn’t have to have his engine sealed.

Now this is confirmed news, Ducati have pointed out that Dovizioso’s improvements in Jerez told them what they needed to know, that further testing is vital for Ducati and allowed under Open rules.

Luigi Dall’Igna, Ducati Corse General Manager added: “We have carefully studied the new technical regulations and have concluded that the Open option is the most interesting for Ducati, in the current situation. This year we have to keep developing our bikes throughout the season to improve our competitiveness, and the Factory option appears to be too restrictive for our needs”.

The final day of the Jerez test also saw Valentino Rossi iron out his Yamaha and tyre issues to go top, pleasing as he was consistent and one of few to touch Marquez pre-injury. He was matched by one fast lap by Dani Pedrosa late in the final day, registering exactly the same time, Rossi had long gone home after a satisfying day of improvements.

The finalised entry lists are available and not only show that Ducati are an open class entry but also bring confirmation of the sad news that Leon Camier is out of a ride for the season as the Iodaracing team drop to just one rider.

Also troubling news coming from the MotoGP.com Twitter feed is that after crashing at a private test

“As of Saturday at 8pm, confirms that remains in a medically induced coma”.

Marinelarena has been in a similar place last season after a race crash, so here’s hoping he can pull through again.

Full entry lists available here.

MotoGP: Valentino Rossi’s helmet for the Sepang 2014 test

MotoGP’s winter break is finally over (as is mine, with plenty of great blog reading for me to catch up on!) and to celebrate here is a picture of Rossi’s helmet for the Sepeng test as seen on Twitter and originally shared by MotoGP.com, hopefully for all his fans it will be the only view his rivals get of his face on track this season!

2014 Rossi Sepang test 1 helmet

Rossi’s helmet will look best if you are behind it! (So far that’s everyone EXCEPT Marquez!)
Image originally shared on twitter by @MotoGP reposted here under the fair use act

So far the helmet has served him well, finishing the first day in Sepang in second behind current World Champion Marc Marquez.

Here is a list of times from day 1:

1. Marc Marquez Repsol Honda Team (RC213V) 2m 0.286s (52/62)
2. Valentino Rossi  Yamaha Factory Racing (YZR-M1) 2m 0.804s | +0.518s (58/61)
3. Dani Pedrosa  Repsol Honda Team (RC213V) 2m 0.906s | +0.620s (73/75)
4. Jorge Lorenzo  Yamaha Factory Racing (YZR-M1) 2m 1.082s | +0.796s (26/47)
5. Alvaro Bautista  Go&Fun Honda Gresini (RC213V) 2m 1.240s | +0.954s (48/52)
6. Stefan Bradl  LCR Honda MotoGP (RC213V) 2m 1.320s | +1.034s (10/25)
7. Aleix Espargaro  NGM Mobile Forward Racing (FTR-M1) 2m 1.419s | +1.133s (19/26)
8. Andrea Iannone  Pramac Racing (Desmosedici) 2m 1.538s | +1.252s (38/44)
9. Pol Espargaro  Monster Yamaha Tech 3 (YZR-M1) 2m 1.634s | +1.348s (42/48)
10. Bradley Smith  Monster Yamaha Tech 3 (YZR-M1) 2m 1.876s | +1.590s (54/55)
11. Colin Edwards  NGM Mobile Forward Racing (FTR-M1) 2m 2.483s | +2.197s (25/26)
12. Andrea Dovizioso  Ducati Team (Desmosedici) 2m 2.497s | +2.211s (21/27)
13. Michele Pirro  Ducati Test Rider (Desmosedici) 2m 2.552s | +2.266s (47/48)
14. Cal Crutchlow  Ducati Team (Desmosedici) 2m 2.860s | +2.574s (16/38)
15. Yonny Hernandez Pramac Racing (Desmosedici) 2m 2.891s | +2.605s (28/49)
16. Katsuyuki Nakasuga  Yamaha Test Rider (YZR-M1) 2m 3.126s | +2.840s (14/35)
17. Nicky Hayden  Drive M7 Aspar (RCV1000R) 2m 3.319s | +3.033s (53/56)
18. Hiroshi Aoyama  Drive M7 Aspar (RCV1000R) 2m 3.328s | +3.042s (49/51)
19. Randy de Puniet  Suzuki Test Rider (XRH-1) 2m 3.893s | +3.607s (47/75)
20. Kosuke Akiyoshi  Honda Test Rider 2m 4.267s | +3.981s (27/64)
21. Scott Redding  Go&Fun Honda Gresini (RCV1000R) 2m 4.431s | +4.145s (41/48)
22. Hector Barbera  Avintia Blusens (FTR-Kawasaki) 2m 4.922s | +4.636s (34/44)
23. Mike di Meglio  Avintia Blusens (FTR-Kawasaki) 2m 5.825s | +5.539s (50/51)
24. Broc Parkes  Paul Bird Motorsport (PBM-ART) 2m 5.889s | +5.603s (32/40)
25. Michael Laverty  Paul Bird Motorsport (PBM-ART) 2m 6.070s | +5.784s (14/14)
26. Karel Abraham  Cardion AB Motoracing (RCV1000R) 2m 6.755s | +6.469s (21/41)

Early indications from day 1 give the impression that a competitive season between Marquez/Rossi/Lorenzo and Pedrosa could be on the cards with Aleix Espargaro giving a star turn once again – impressing in the Open class, as he did as a CRT rider. Ducati still seem to have work to do…

MotoGP: Are Ducati planning a move into the open class for 2014?

First, a shameless plug.

This was originally going to just be news, but solid sources and some good quotes mean the news bit is now here at crash.net:

http://www.crash.net/motogp/news/199360/1/ducati-switching-to-open-class-for-motogp-2014.html

The website is also a great place to discuss the story with 38 comments after just a few hours in print as I type this (it currently has 123 Facebook likes, 54 re-tweets and amazingly has even amassed two whole +1 Google shares as of now!)

I think after Ducati’s news a sit down with a nice strong cup of tea is in order!
Ducati cups image by e-supreme available via Flickr and used under the creative commons agreement.

So for those who are still here reading instead here’s whats occurred.

In an interview posted by Italian based website GPOne.com (link to site available in Crash.net article) Ducati rider Andrea Dovizioso is quoted as saying that when testing resumes in February in Sepang that the ‘Factory’ team riders will be testing both the prototype GP14 they were expecting to be riding next season… and the ‘Open’ class Ducati that will be used by Pramac rider Yonny Hernandez.

Ducati seem keen to reveal that they have found little difference in the performance of the two bikes in the testing done so far. The plan therefore seems to be to run an as close to ‘Factory’ effort as possible while exploiting the benefits which come from being an ‘Open’ class entry – more fuel allowance, less engine restriction and as it stands, softer tyre options.

The major negative is the requirement to run the spec ECU package.

On the face of it, if all goes to plan this could be a shrewd move by Ducati.

The Desmosedici has not won a race since 2010 and struggled to a best of fourth last season. It was previously a championship winner under the control of Casey Stoner.

It is clear that after drafting in some of the worlds best mechanics, riders and developers with, for whatever reason, no improvement, that something must be done.

There is a level of expertise to the idea too – Ducati’s new General Manager, Gigi Dall’Igna, was in control at Aprilla last year instead, spearheading the performance of the only CRT bike entries to challenge the Factory and Satellite teams, with CRT champion Aleix Espargaro aboard the most successful of the bikes and often finding his skills mixed with the performance more than a match for the Satellite Ducati’s and even tangling with their Factory entries for final position.

The Open class has been brought in to replace the CRT category.

Though it looks to be a smart move, and certain to put Honda’s backs up (they had threatened to pull out of the championship over future electrical changes and restrictions so another GOOD thing to come from this if it goes ahead) it was until yesterday, until it was said, unthinkable. A step backwards for some of the red machines fans. A step away from a coveted ‘Factory’ bike for the riders.

If you are a casual bike follower perhaps it is easiest to consider it in terms of another sport, lets try F1 for an example:

The equivalent would be telling Vettel he was going to ride out 2014 in a new, improved Torro Rosso instead of the Red Bull but it will still be competitive as he has more fuel to play with and can hopefully use some really soft tyres, as long as the rules aren’t changed before the start of the season. And he doesn’t have to have his engine sealed.

Exactly.

Dovizioso is currently putting a brave face on his ride into/onto the unknown next month.

His very honest and vocal new team-mate Cal Crutchlow is a newlywed. when he returns from his honeymoon it will be interesting to see where he stands on the idea as, though he had little option in the end, he had always backed up his move to Ducati with the argument that he wanted to be at a ‘Factory Team’ to be able to win races…

Personally I hope the test goes well and the move works in their favour, competition is needed to make MotoGP a great spectacle again, and if this gives Ducati the ability to mix it up with the Yamaha and Honda riders, then that can only be a positive, for the championship and viewers alike.

 

MotoGP: Image of the GP – Indianapolis – flying Ducati’s!

ducati  Hayden Dovizioso wheels up over rumble strip Indianapolis 2013

Ducati’s at play – airborne style!
Image credit to @Charlie76king on Twitter, editorial use only.

As it’s a busy few weeks of GP action here’s the Image of the GP for Indianapolis during Brno race weekend (Ahem, oops!)

Ducati already said it all when as Hayden and Dovizioso clashed on the final laps final corner flying over the rumble strip, leaving both bikes with their wheels off the ground they said “After the race in Indianapolis, we know that our riders are both very motivated!”

Both riders were called to see the Ducati bosses and asked to try and avoid a repeat – it’s the third time the team-mates have clashed this season following  their final corner clash in Assen and when they touched in the Laguna Seca race last month.

Now, time to race in Brno…

MotoGP: Stefan Bradl – A nice new livery to go with a nice new contract!

The Red Bull Indianapolis Grand Prix has already been good for Stefan Bradl before he’s even turned a tyre in an official session.

Bradl Red Bull Indianapolis

New Paint job, new contract…now all he needs is a podium finish to put a cherry on top!
Bradl poses with his LCR Honda and some very famous bricks- image via LCR Honda, editorial use only

He already has an eye-catching, Red Bull sponsor themed new paint job for the weekend – but that’s small-fry after officially signing to ride for LCR for the 2014 season.

The German former Moto2 champion, who achieved his best performance to date with his first podium (finishing 2nd) from his maiden pole in Laguna Seca had previously also briefly lead his home race at the Sachsenring last month, and now returns from the summer break with a lot to celebrate.

LCR’s statement, released on Thursday said:

“LCR Honda Team is pleased to announce that Stefan Bradl has confirmed the agreement with Honda Racing Corporation (HRC) to line up as a Honda “factory supported” rider competing for the LCR Team in the 2014 MotoGP World Championship.”

Bradl Himself went on to add:

“HRC’s support was extremely important for me in my first season in the premier class and, with their direct cooperation, I achieved my first podium in the top class this year,” Bradl comments. “I am happy to continue with Lucio’s Team because we know each other very well now and we have built a professional and friendly atmosphere in the team which allows me to be at 100% every race.”

Team Manager Lucio Cecchinello remains happy to have Bradl on board and reflected on the recent podium, an achievement for not just Bradl, but the whole LCR outfit:

“Being a part of HRC’s program and continuing our sport project with Stefan through to 2014 make us very happy and very proud. Stefan has amazed everybody at his debut in 2012 and is now showing his progress in the MotoGP class. His first MotoGP podium was a great result for him and for the whole Team so, from our side, we will do our best to support Stefan in 2014.”

Yet for the rumour mill it is another door slammed shut.

With 2014 rides in short supply and a lot of speculation remaining someone will have to miss out.

As it stands:

Factory Yamaha –  Valentino Rossi and Jorge Lorenzo remain under contract until 2014

Repsol Honda – Dani Pedrosa and Marc Marquez remain under contract until 2014

Ducati Team  – Andrea Dovizioso is under contract until 2014. He is Joined by Cal Crutchlow with a contract up to the 2015 season.

Tech3 Yamaha – Bradley Smith and the incoming Pol Espargaro under contract until 2014, though Espargaro is contracted to Yamaha up to 2015.

LCRHonda –  Stefan Bradl has a new contract for the 2014 season

Gresini Honda – Alvaro Baurista is contracted to the end of the 2014 season

Pramac Ducati – Ben Spies is under contract for the 2014 season

The CRT seats are a little more open ended with little definite to go on yet.

There is strong rumour that Gresini at least will have a second bike , this time thought to be a production racer which is hotly rumored to be filled by Brit Moto2 leader Scott Redding. He confirmed at the recent BT Sport launch that he will definitely be making the move up to the top tier of MotoGP racing, but did not reveal with which team he has made the move.

The other main satellite machine yet to be confirmed is Andrea Iannone’s Pramac seat, though he is expected to renew shortly.

With the injection of Honda machinery and Yamaha engines the world of CRT is morphing away from where it currently stands, Forward Racing have already announced they will be using Yamaha power in the hope of becoming more competitive.

Nicky Hayden’s seat at Ducati was quickly filled by Crutchlow, with the American having made no announcement as of yet of what his future holds.

So, for the meantime, ‘silly season’ continues…

MotoGP: Image of the GP – look, I can fly!

The Sachsenring race weekend contained a lot of crashes and a lot of spectacular imagery to illustrate what a flying MotoGP rider looks like for those who missed practice, where much of the action happened.

My favourite image has not got a rider in mid-air, but is instead an image of the current championship bucking bronco of a ride-  the Ducati – in action, and it was the fancy new prototype bike that Dovizioso saw off at the beginning of the weekend. It’s position in the sky suggests why.

gigi soldano ducati

I can fly! Andrea Dovizioso’s factory Ducati tries flying, turns out to be an expensive experiment.
Image by Gigi Soldano shared on Twitter at @GigiSoldano

I made it my feature image as it conjures up thoughts of great conversations in the Ducati camp:

Dovi: Look Nicky, I can go higher than yooooooou!

Hayden: But Y’all meant to go straight not up!

Back in the Garage…

Hayden: Please tell me you didn’t give him the fancy new one…

*Ducati mechanics shuffle while staring at feet*

 

Though the funniest image of the weekend came via Moto3 rider Luis Salom and the marshals deckchair, which you can see here – If you can’t beat them.. have a sit down!

Laguna Seca is this weekend so get well soon to Dani Pedrosa, Jorge Lorenzo, Andrea Iannone and those who rode through the pain – Hector Barbera, Cal Crutchlow, Xavier Simeon, Tito Rabat (Moto2 wasn’t exempt from pain) did I miss anyone off? So many crashes!

MotoGP: De Angelis in for Spies at Laguna Seca

Former MotoGP rider Alex De Angelis has recieved the call to fill the seat that it supposed to belong to Ben Spies at the Pramac Ducati satellite outfit for the Laguna Seca round of the MotoGP World Championship.

The injured American is not expected to return until Indianapolis (August 18) at the earliest and his regular replacement for the season Michele Pirro is already booked for test duties with Ducati for the weekend of July 23-25 in Misano, so as De Angelis will not be required by his Forward Racing Moto2 team – neither of the two support classes race in Laguna – they have released him to appear in MotoGP that weekend.

Pirro has so far scored points in all his MotoGP appearances either on the Ducati test bike, which is meant to be his main job for the year or as a replacement rider for Spies.

De Angelis is no stranger to the MotoGP class himself, the San Marino rider had a Honda Gresini seat for the 2008 and 2009 seasons, where he had a best result of second at Indianapolis, he later stood in for Hiroshi Aoyama while injured  for three races for Interwetten Honda in 2010.

It was rumoured that both former MotoGP race winner and Moto2 champion Toni Elias and American Roger Lee Hayden were also considered as possibles to fill the temporary position.

To prepare De Angelis will now attend the Ducati test in Misano this Thursday along with factory team racers Nicky Hayden and Andrea Dovizoso and his future Pramac team-mate – for one race only- Andrea Iannone.

As a reminder of his character here’s a look at Alex’s choice of helmets, usually loud and mutlicoloured and stripey thanks to the inclusion of the San Marino flag and often carrying his wasp motif after he claimed to have one inside his helmet during a MotoGP race.

dea1

All the colours…and a wasp!
image by Vemar Helmets press release, graphic created by Air Kustom Design

Dea2

More colour, more wasp!
Image via Vemar Helmets press release

Andrea Iannone and the Wild Rodeo of Mugello!

Valentino Rossi isn’t the only Italian rider to splash out on a special helmet for their home Grand Prix in Mugello. Pramac Ducati rider Andrea Iannone is also sporting some pretty original artwork for the weekend, featuring a graphic of a cartoon Iannone riding a Pramac coloured bull with his racing number on the forehead and his target logo made of plasters, presumably all a comment on the tricky nature of riding a Ducati, with most of their currently fielded MotoGP riders sporting some kind of injury.

Image below via @andreaiannone29 – the riders official twitter account.

Iannone 2013 mugello special

Iannone shows of his Mugello 2013 special!